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Curriculum Center

curriculum centerThe Curriculum Center is one of the library’s most unique and popular collections. It is a specialized collection of PreK- 12 materials that all majors may find useful. Materials in the Curriculum Center include books, big books, toys, games, unit & lesson plans, movies, textbooks, activity books, kits, fiction books, non-fiction books, and educational e-books that you can borrow. These items may be used to enrich and add interest to lesson plans or presentations, to students or adults, in a range of subject areas or situations.

The center has a large fiction collection that includes many of the new young adult series. Our non-fiction collection has numerous animal books that may be of interest to ABEC majors. The center has some high school level textbooks that may assist you in your introductory courses, ex, Chemistry, Physics, Calculus. Criminal Justice, Psychology, or Counseling majors may find the materials helpful when connecting with clients. There is a potential use with virtually any field or major.

Citation Guide

I need to cite that? How do I do that?

Most research assignments require you to gather, evaluate, and use the work of others. When you use others’ work you must give them credit. Assignments vary, and different professors may want you to use a different citation styles. APA, MLA, Turabian, Chicago, CSE…the list goes on and on and it is enough to make your head spin.

How do you begin to make sense of this? Well, you may want to look at our citation guide to help you navigate through many of the different citation styles. The guide includes sample papers, videos on how create citations, recommended citation generators and much more.

Case Studies - Business & Marketing

Need to find a Case Study for your Business or Marketing Class? A case study tells what happened to and within a business or industry over time.

The best place to find these documents is a business database. Canisius has access to many different business databases and most have case studies, but the best database to start in is ABI/Inform. Begin by typing in your company or industry name. Then scroll down to Document type. Click on the box next to “case study” and then click the search button. Another option is to search with the keywords “case study” AND your company name or industry, ex. “case study” AND manufacturing.

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Medical Case Studies

Finding Case Studies for your Bio Classes can be a bit tricky but the library is here to help. A Case Study is an implementation of a research method involving an up-close, in-depth, and detailed examination of a subject of study. There are a few sources to help you do this. The best way is to use the Medline database. Begin by typing in the name of a disease or disorder. Then scroll down and under “Document Type”, choose “Case Reports” and then run your search. Another option is to use The General Science Collection database. Here, you choose Advanced search in the header bar (looks like a magnifying glass). After typing in your search, there is a pull down menu called “Select Document Type(s)” and you can choose “Case Study”.

Medline:

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Library Printing Changes

Over break, the college has replaced the printers in the library. There are some changes you need to be aware of.

  • When printing from a Library computer you have 2 new choices:
    • To print in Black and White, select: PAPERCUT00-MyGrayscalePrintJob
    • To print in Color, select: PAPERCUT00-MyColorPrintJob
  • You absolutely need a Canisius ID card in order to print.
    • You can no longer type in your Student ID number at the release stations.
  • Library staff does not have the ability to release prints for anyone who:
    • does not have their ID card.
    • is printing for work study purposes.
  • If you print from a personal laptop, you will have to reconfigure your device to the new system.
  • If you have any issues setting this up, contact ITS.

Faculty, Get Your Items on Course Reserve

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Faculty, if you need library items placed on course reserve please submit this form. Provide as much detail for each item that you can (Title, Author, Publication Date, Call Number). The more information you provide, the easier it will be for us to retrieve the item for you.

If you would like an item on reserve that the library does not currently own, please contact your library liaison to facilitate that purchase. Please let your liaison know that you need the item for reserve and for what class it is for. As soon as we receive the item it will be processed and put on course reserve.

As per library policy, we do not purchase textbooks. If you would like a personal copy of a textbook on reserve, please bring it to the Library Service Desk and fill out a paper reserve request form. Due to copyright restrictions, all Course Reserves will be removed at the end of every semester.

Seasons Readings 2015

This is our annual collection of Library Seasons Readings staff book recommendations

Kristine Kasbohm - Director of Library

The Housekeeper and the Professor by Yoko Ogawa, translated by Stephen Snyder - PL858.G37 H3513 2009

This beautifully written, short novel is far more complex than it first appears. It is the story of a math professor who is forced to give up the work he loves when a brain injury leaves him with only eighty minutes of short-term memory. A woman with a ten-year-old son is hired to care for him. Although they are introduced to each other anew every day (sometimes more than once a day), the three form a bond over math and baseball. The story becomes a great reminder to be fully present and live in the moment.

 

Rosalie Serba - Collection Services Coordinator 

Bird Minds: Cognition and Behaviour of Australian Native Birds by Gisela Kaplan - QL698.3 K37 2015

My love of animals goes beyond your typical pet. As an owner of these beautiful and complex creatures, I like to keep well informed and read any new information about parrots. “Bird Minds” provides a fresh view of the behavior of Australian native birds. It focuses on their specific abilities, examining why they have had to find mostly cognitive ways of adapting to difficult conditions. The demands of the environment have led to the development of cognitive complicated processes that are unique, including complex behaviors such as grieving, deception, problem solving and the use of tools. Many Australian birds cooperate and defend each other, and exceptional ones go fishing by throwing breadcrumbs in the water, extract poisonous parts from prey and use tools to open food. Understanding avian cognition and behavior in the wild can help me create a more enriching life in captivity. 

 

Lisa Sullivan - Reference Librarian / Head of Curriculum Center

Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner by Judy Melinek, M.D., and T. J. Mitchell - RA1025.M45 A3 2014

An interesting and at times disturbing book about the different cases a NYC medical examiner handled during her first 2 years on the job. It shows the world of forensic pathology as it really is, not how it appears on television; and includes fascinating accounts of routine autopsies, dealings with surviving relatives and the castastrophe of September 11th. A Vivid and riveting read for any forensic junkie.

 

 

Jessie Blum - Reference Librarian and Instructional Services

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr - PS3604.O34 A77 2014

A heart breaking tale set in France and Germany during WWII. “All the light” is the story of 16 year old Marie-Laure who is forced to evacuate her home in Paris and Werner whose talent with fixing radios leads him a place at the academy for the Hitler Youth. Both young characters are caught up in the war in ways that are out of their control. Doerr’s story is beautiful and moving.

 

 

Barbara Boehnke - Associate Library Director

My Secret Places: One Man's Love Affair With Nature in the City by Leonard Dubkin - QH105.I3 D8

Ever since childhood I have searched for secret places in the city.  Recently I learned about a companion who shared in this quest.  Leonard Dubkin searched for, found and wrote about wildlife in Chicago.  As a child he rode the buses to the edge of the city, observed snakes, birds, insects and plants.  When he returned to his neighborhood he wrote about his discoveries using a typewriter in Hull House, which Jane Addams was kind enough to allow him to use.   As an adult his young daughter taught him to find nature in a patch of grass in front of their apartment building.   He concludes by noting the disappearance of many of his secret places, but asserts there remain secret places still where "one can discover oneself reborn in nature."  

 

George Emery - Library Digital Services and Project Manager

Days of Rage: America's Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violance by Bryan Burrough - HN90.R3 B79 2015

This is a fascinating account of the armed radical underground movement that carried out bombings, kidnappings, bank robberies and murders from the late Sixties to the mid-Eighties with the intent of bringing down the government. These waves of domestic terrorism gripped America at the time and it is hard to believe that in these current days of political hysteria and fear of terrorism that people have forgotten that there were over 1,900 bombings in America just in 1972 alone. Another interesting aspect of this book is the story of how the FBI abused the rights and privacy of all Americans in their attempts to find the revolutionaries which of course is something still very relevant today. The book has been exhaustively researched, includes insightful interviews and often reads like a novel.

 

 

Matt Kochan - Public Service Supervisor

Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity by David Allen - BF637.R5 A45 2001

 

If you are a person who has struggled with maintaining any organization, this book is for you.  Everyone has experienced times when everything seemed effortless, and progress limitless. David Allen has captured ways for you to achieve that wonderful state of mind and consciousness more often.  I have just started the system and am seeing the benefits already.  While the process will not become second nature overnight, it seems promising for me.

 

 

 

 

Kathleen DeLaney - Archivist & Special Collections Librarian

What We Found There: Poets Respond to the Treasures of The National Museum of Ireland by Theo Dorgan, Editor 

It’s very hard to write a good, pithy description to place alongside an object in an exhibit case.  Does anyone read them? These days we’re used to the lemming-like, techno- filled tours in galleries, libraries, archives and museums. Why go to them anyway?  They do have a point, and this lovely, slim volume of poetry lets you know why. What I liked…a lot…about this book…is its simplicity. Using a clever trope for discovery, editor/poet Theo Dorgan invites forty-four Irish poets to take a trip to their National Museum, chose an object, and write about what they found. Not saw, but what they found there. Big difference. Each poet chooses something from the ordinary, utilitarian, rich detritus of human life. The mystery (reliquary),  the obvious  (chairs), the  poignant ( “in order of placement a gun, a tunic button, fountain pen” all once owned by Michael Collins hero or traitor---, depending on your politics). The poet focuses on the familiar with musings or a quirky observation. Just one person’s found treasure. are what those poets found there, too. Doesn’t matter what culture, heritage, race or creed you ascribe to. Exhibits connect us to who we are as humans. It’s worth tagging along on this tour.

 

Joel Cohen - Reference Librarian

The Martian by Andy Weir - Leisure Reading

Math, science, adventure? A geek can hardly go wrong! The story starts with an emergency evacuation of a Mars mission, but a crew member is left for dead. It turns out he wasn’t.  If you are only interested in the adventure story part, see the excellent movie with Matt Damon. But if you want to see the calculations and science that were necessary to prolong the life of a survivor until rescue was possible, read the book. Math and science can be fun!

Ask Us 24/7

You can always get help from a librarian, even if the library is closed or you cannot stop by in person. Ask Us 24/7 is an online chat service that allows you to ask your research questions and enter a live discussion with a librarian who can help you.

The service is designed to assist you with identifying useful sources, locating those sources and citing materials. It is not the best place to ask questions about your library account, fines or renewing materials. Please ask those questions by calling 716-888-8411. This is a shared service so you may be working with a librarian from out of state or even another country. Give it a try at Question Point!

Interlibrary Loan (ILL)

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The Canisius College Library would be happy to assist students, faculty and staff to acquire books, magazine, newspaper or journal articles for you from other libraries. You can initiate your request by filling out the ILL form at https://illiad.canisius.edu/ or by clicking the link provided in many of our databases including those from Summon or EBSCOhost.

The first time you use this service, you may have to register by filling out a simple form. Once received, articles and book chapters will be delivered electronically, via PDF, often within a few hours. Books will be held for pick up at the service desk. This service is for books and articles only. Most libraries will not lend textbooks or audio visual materials. If you need any assistance with this service, just stop by the Service Desk or call 716-888-8414

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